Best Desserts in Rome Italy

Best Desserts in Rome Italy

When you step into a country that is home to about a gazillion desserts, it is hard not to keep nagging sweet cravings at bay. This is especially so in Rome where streets are lined with rows of cafeterias and bakeries, perfumed by the wafting fragrance of sweet treats. You’ll surely be in for a sugar rush if you end up savoring the city’s best desserts, some of which have been shared in this very article.

Tiramisu at Bar Pompi

Credits: Zomato

One of the first Italian desserts that come to mind would be the tiramisu. Translated into “pick me up“ in English, this highly raved classic Italian staple is ubiquitous in Rome, and the place which has been serving Rome’s most celebrated tiramisu since 1962 is none other than Bar Pompi. This gelateria and pasticceria have been crowned as the king of tiramisu. After all, it has been attracting swarms of tourists as well as Romans across the city, all eager to sink their teeth in the decadence that awaits them.

At Pompi, the tiramisu comes in a dinky rectangular box and comprises spongy pavesini biscuits soaked in just the right amount of freshly brewed coffee. Thus, they are neither too dry nor too soggy, and the liquor taste is not too headachy (unlike many cheap imitations out there). Encasing the biscuits are creamy, luscious layers of mascarpone mousse which are topped with chocolate chunks for some crunch factor.

If you are not a huge fan of coffee, there is a wide selection of tiramisu flavors for you to choose from, be it nutty such as hazelnut and pistachio, or fruity such as banana and strawberry.

Pompi has a total of 6 outlets throughout Rome, and the tiramisu prices are around 6 Euros for single servings, 17 Euros for family boxes, and 25 Euros for cakes.

Cannoli at La Cannoleria Siciliana

Credits: Official Website of La Cannoleria Siciliana

One of the most well-known specialties of Sicilian pastry is the cannoli. Once prepared only during carnivals or special occasions, cannolis are now being churned at bakeries and cafeterias worldwide, quickly turning into a quintessence of Italian pastry art.

Situated on the east bank of the Tiber, pastry shop La Cannoleria Siciliana has been selling a vast array of authentic cannolis since 2008, with an immense focus on the quality of raw materials used and the craftsmanship of the bakes. Although there is indoor seating, many customers order takeaways to bask in the beatific sights along the walk to the Tiber.

Each cannoli here constitutes a dough wafer, fried till crisp enough to avoid absorbing too much oil. Injected into the flaky layers of pastry is a dollop of sweetened sheep’s milk ricotta that is rich but not surfeiting. This filling comes in various flavors, such as the traditional vanilla custard as well as pistachio, hazelnut, and Nutella.

For those unable to consume gluten, you will be delighted to hear that this shop whips up scrumptious gluten-free cannolis too, which you can ask for specifically as they might not be displayed for customers walking into the store.

These cannolis have a crunchier shell, decked with chocolate chips.

There are 5 outlets of La Cannoleria Siciliana throughout Rome, with each cannoli costing around 2.50 Euros.

Gelato at Gelateria Valentino

Credits: HappyCow

Of course, we can’t forget about enjoying some classic gelatos in Rome. What's more, to have a sensual gastronomic experience of Rome’s most popular gelatos in a gelateria that has been featured in numerous television shows.

This family business was founded by ice cream maker Jonathan Quarto and his parents, Valentino and Cecilia. Their warm hospitality and merry nature have led to customers re-visiting the store again and again. Not only that, but the store is also just a stone’s throw away from the Fountain of Trevi so it is highly accessible to both locals and tourists. And obviously, the gelatos here are super addictive.

If you loved food, we also covered pizzas in Rome Italy worth trying.

With zero artificial flavorings or ingredients, Gelateria Valentino has been a bestseller of gelatos and sorbets, as you might have already guessed from the tons of positive reviews it has received. One of its best gelatos is the pistachio gelato, which has a sweet, nutty profile pronounced in the airy, soft cream. Furthermore, nearly every classic Italian ice cream flavor is there. You have richer gelatos such as dark chocolate, Ferrero Roche, and salted caramel, and zesty gelatos such as passionfruit, lemon, and yogurt. Moreover, vegan options are available as well, as rich as ever!

The gelateria is located at Via del Lavatore, 96, 00187 and the average price for 2 scoops is around 3 Euros.

Panna Cotta at Osteria Da Fortunata

Credits: TripAdvisor

It may not be a cafeteria or another common dessert-based tuck shop but trust me, this restaurant sells Rome’s best panna cotta that has been securing high ratings over the years.

Called the Osteria Da Fortunata, this Italian restaurant is just a 1-minute walk from the Piazza Campo de’Fiori, AKA the most popular market in the old center of Rome. After feasting on the delectable spread of classics there, such as gnocchi and cheese ravioli, a panna cotta would be the perfect ending to your meal.

This afters is as smooth as butter with just a slight wobble, testimony to the reduced levels of gelatin used. With a hint of white chocolate, the pudding-like concoction is too tasty for words, like a dreamy sweet cloud. To top it all off, the drizzle of strawberry compote cuts through the richness with its tart, slightly sweet presence. If you end up feeling guilty for having had too much panna cotta (I mean, who wouldn’t ?), it might help to know that the restaurant only uses organic products. At least we are assured that there are no unhealthy additives or chemicals inside!

The exact address of the restaurant is Via del Pellegrino, 11/12, 0018; and a full meal with the panna cotta as dessert typically costs around 17 Euros.

We also have the best budget hotels in Rome Italy and where to workout in Rome

Efforts have been made to get the information as accurate and updated as possible. If you found any incorrect information with credible source, please send it via the contact us form
Author: Liyana Mokhtar Hussein
Liyana enjoy exploring different cultures and cuisines during the travels.
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